Mowzey Radio

Celebrating the Life & Music of Uganda’s Mowzey Radio

The year was 2008. Finally, I was achieving a long-held childhood dream: I had officially moved to Uganda.

Nothing could contain the contentedness I felt inside.

Finally, I lived in the place that I affectionately call “the home of my heart.”

It was not a period of my life without uncertainties, but finally I had done it!

It was during this time in my life that I first heard the music of the Ugandan artist I want to talk about today: Mowzey Radio.

As half of the music duo Radio & Weasel, Mowzey Radio was hard to miss that year because, everywhere you went in Uganda, you were bound to come across the catchy love song “Nakudata”, sung part in Swahili, part in Luganda, and part in English.

I was hooked.

I loved the song and would often play it on repeat.

READ ALSO: New Music from Tanzania: ‘Mpokee’ by Ericomsongz ft. Kellah

But to be honest, it’s the song I liked.

I didn’t know much about Radio & Weasel. I had no clue whether they would be a one-hit wonder or if they would have longevity on the Ugandan music scene.

Fast forward two years, and it was clear that Radio & Weasel were a musical force to reckon with.

They had kept a steady stream of hits coming, and even though I had since moved to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, they were playing on my car radio, being played at clubs…you name it.

To hear the distinct melodious voice of Mowzey Radio or the ruff-and-gruff sound of Weasel’s Jamaican-style dancehall animations in a song would have my ears perking up in attention, either to sing along to one of their songs whose lyrics I knew, of course, or to take note of a new song that I could be sure I would soon come to love.

Radio & Weasel

And then on February 1, 2018, I was chatting on Whatsapp with a Ugandan-American friend who lives in Washington, D.C.

As our conversations often do nowadays, this one too was laced with the marked awareness of our quickly advancing age.

Then, seemingly out of the blue, my friend wrote:

“Life is short. Look at Radio and Weasel. Dude died earlier.

Radio died. I’m sad, I loved his voice.”

Surely, she couldn’t be right.

Not Mowzey Radio of Radio & Weasel.

How had I not heard? How had this news skipped me in Tanzania and traveled all the way to the U.S. before I found out?

I quickly checked on the internet to see if there was any truth to what my friend was telling me.

Sadly, it was true: Mowzey Radio was no more.

I was stupefied…and two months later, I still can’t quite wrap my head around it.

Why Mowzey? Why someone so young? Why a talent that had touched so many lives? And above all, why such a futile death?

We may never get answers to these questions but today, I would like to do my little part in celebrating a musician who brought me, and so many others, a whole lot of fun and joy.

Today, folks, I would like to share with you my favorite Mowzey Radio songs.

In fact, I will share 9 to be precise.

Why 9 not 10? Because, I just couldn’t do it!

I couldn’t limit my selection to only ten songs, so I am going to cheat a little.

The 10th selection on this list is a 52-song BRILLIANT hour-and-a-half-long tribute mix by Ugandan DJ Ciza (The Real Crowd Pleaza) that does an amazing job of showcasing Mowzey Radio’s decade-long musical career.

Trust me: you want to listen to this. It will have you getting up and dancing wherever you are!

So with no further ado, my 9 favourite songs by Mowzey Radio are:

1. Nakudata by Radio & Weasel

2. Bread & Butter by Radio & Weasel

3. Amaaso by Radio & Weasel featuring Palasso and The Mess

4. Neera by Radio & Weasel

5. Heart Attack (Vuvuzela) by Radio & Weasel

6. Where You Are by Radio & Weasel featuring Blu 3

7. Zuena by Radio & Weasel

8. I Love You by Radio & Weasel featuring Vampino

9. How We Do It by Keko, Weasel and Radio

And now as promised, the fabulous number 10.

10. Mowzey Radio Tribute by DJ Ciza

Thank you, DJ Ciza, for letting me share this mix here with my readers.

Folks, if you are unable to listen to this mix all the way until the end (I think my server might only allow you to stream 20 minutes of it), then you can listen to it in its entirety here. You can also download it there for free.

Rest in peace, Mowzey Radio. Thank you so much for sharing your amazing talent with us!


So, dear reader, had you ever heard of Mowzey Radio before reading this post (of course, that question is geared more towards my non-East African readers)? If so, were you a fan of his music? For those of you who were familiar with his music, what was your favourite Mowzey Radio song? Please let me know by leaving a comment below.

As always, I look forward to hearing what you have to say.

Until the next time,
Biche

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Photo Credits: Independentnaijaturnup.com

2 thoughts on “Celebrating the Life & Music of Uganda’s Mowzey Radio”

I know I am late to the party, but I identify with alot of the sentiment here. I was a radio fan without even realising how much. I wasnt one of them who deliberately sought out the music and yet living in Kampala the music was always there. I was so sad to hear he died, it was then I realised I really did love his music

Hi Joe,

So…since this is your first comment on my blog, allow me to give you the official welcome: welcome to Chick About Town!

Well said: “…and yet living in Kampala the music was always there”. My condolences to you as a fellow Radio fan. May he live on through his music and in our hearts.

Biche

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